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Tuesday, July 21, 2020 | History

5 edition of Fruit flies and the sterile insect technique found in the catalog.

Fruit flies and the sterile insect technique

Fruit flies and the sterile insect technique

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  • 1 Currently reading

Published by CRC Press in Boca Raton, FL .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Fruit-flies -- Biological control -- Congresses,
  • Insect sterilization -- Congresses

  • Edition Notes

    Statementedited by Carrol O. Calkins, Waldemar Klassen, Pablo Liedo.
    ContributionsCalkins, Carrol O., Klassen, Waldemar., Liedo, Palbo., International Congress of Entomology (1992 : Beijing, China)
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSB945.F8 F75 1994
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1089185M
    ISBN 100849348544
    LC Control Number94013258

    The fly was eradicated from North America to the Darien Gap in Panama (Wyss, ) using releases of large numbers of irradiated sterile flies (i.e. the sterile insect technique, SIT) targeting. The sterile insect technique is the first involving insect genetics for population control, and it can be applied only to pest species that reproduce by sexual means. It is effective only if the sexually sterile males are aggressive and successfully compete with wild males in searching for and mating with indigenous females.

    The document contains thirty-four papers on a broad range of topics concerning fruit flies, including area-wide programmes, control methods and supporting technology, chemical ecology and attractants, biology, ecology, physiology and behaviour, the Sterile Insect Technique, natural enemies and biological control, and risk analysis. •.   Background. The olive fruit fly, Bactrocera oleae, is the major arthropod pest of commercial olive production, causing extensive damage to olive crops t control techniques rely on spraying of chemical insecticides. The sterile insect technique (SIT) presents an alternative, environmentally friendly and species-specific method of population by:

    the Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) and other pests, using the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT), an environmentally friendly, non-chemical pest control method. Bio-Fly's activities are an additional component of Bio-Bee‘s vision of advancing and implementing means and measures that are non-chemical in the control of key pests to modern.   By Andrew Porterfield. For sterile insect techniques to control pests, the sterile insect must be attractive. For two species of Anastrepha fruit flies, the West Indian fruit fly (A. obliqua) and the Mexican fruit fly (A. ludens), the size of the male in one was important for a female’s selection, while size did not matter in the other species. Andrew Porterfield.


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Fruit flies and the sterile insect technique Download PDF EPUB FB2

Overview This book is a continuation of the development of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) specifically designed for use against, and management of, fruit flies.

Several factors indicate an increased use of the SIT against fruit flies within the next Pages: Summary: This book is a continuation of the development of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) specifically designed for use against, and management of, fruit flies.

Several factors indicate an increased use of the SIT against fruit flies within the next decade. The fifth and sixth sections examine biological control methods such as the Sterile Insect Technique and the use of natural enemies of fruit flies.

The seventh section focuses on area-wide integrated pest management and action : Diana Perez-Staples, Francisco Diaz-Fleischer, Pablo Montoya, Maria Teresa Vera. Examines the latest developments in the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) specifically designed to control fruit flies.

The use of SIT is forecast to increase over the next decade. Several factors have influenced this, including economic considerations. in this book, the sterile insect technique (SIT), a component of these programmes, has come of age.

The technology has expanded rapidly — additional target species, new rearing techniques, studies on genetics and insect behaviour, and especially integration into operational area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes.

Improving the Efficacy of the Sterile Insect Technique for Fruit Flies by Incorporation of Hormone and Dietary Supplements into Adult Holding Protocols. Chapter January with Reads. How. The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an environment-friendly method of pest control that integrates well into area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programmes.

A first of its kind, this book takes a generic, comprehensive, and global approach in describing the principles and practice of the SIT. Sterile insect technique is a biological control method that helps reduce broad-spectrum chemical treatments. It is used with other techniques such as protein baiting and orchard hygiene to create fruit fly-free areas, or areas of low pest prevalence.

It is an area-wide technique and must be applied over large areas, to be effective. SIT is environmentally friendly, making it very acceptable. The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a form of birth control imposed on a population of an insect pest to reduce its numbers. Thus far, this has involved rearing large numbers of the target insect pest species, exposing them to gamma rays to induce sexual sterility and releasing them into the target population of the pest on an ecosystem-wide or area-wide basis.

The sterile insect technique (SIT) is a technique in which a large number of sterilized insects is released to reduce mating between fertile wild counterparts. This technique was reported to successfully eradicate the New World screwworm, the tsetse fly, melon fruit fly, Queensland fruit fly, pink bollworm.

The sterile insect technique (SIT) is an environmen-tally benign approach for suppressing or eradicating insect pests, and it is widely used in integrated pro-grams against tephritid fruit ßy pests, particularly the Mediterranean fruit ßy, Ceratitis capitata (Wiede-mann)(Diptera:Tephritidae)(Hendrichsetal).

The technique involves mass. Tephritid fruit flies cause major losses in fruit and vegetables, and are often the target of intensive insecticide applications to protect commercial production.

In addition, few pests have a greater impact on world trade in agricultural products than tephritid fruit flies. Their economic consequences are so great that countries free of the major tephritids (Chile, Japan, New.

Courtship and the Effectiveness of the Sterile Insect Technique. True fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae) are agricultural pests that attack many commercially important fruits and vegetables, particularly in tropical and subtropical regions (White and Elson-Harris ).A variety of management tools have been developed to suppress or eradicate these pests, including male annihilation, protein Cited by:   The document contains thirty-four papers on a broad range of topics concerning fruit flies, including area-wide programmes, control methods and supporting technology, chemical ecology and attractants, biology, ecology, physiology and behaviour, the Sterile Insect Technique, natural enemies and biological control, and risk analysis.

Abstract. We present a theoretical study of the management of a campaign to eradicate an invasive population of Mediterranean fruit flies, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.), by application of the sterile insect technique, or SIT. The model for the process consists of three interacting populations: wild females, released sterile males, and females in the rearing by: 8.

The sterile insect technique, or SIT, has been used for decades to control insects such as the Mediterranean fruit fly. Basically, insects are exposed to radiation, which makes them sterile, and then they’re released into the wild to mate.

However, since they’re sterile, no viable offspring are produced. The program's ultimate target, though, is not the adult insect, but rather its larval stage, during which it feeds inside the fruit of host crops, rendering them unfit for consumption or sale.

At the heart of Mexico's anti-fly program is the sterile insect technique (SIT), which involves sterilizing millions of male fruit flies with irradiation. The sterile insect technique (SIT), involving the release of artificially reared sterile males, offers an environmentally friendly option for tsetse control and has been used successfully to eliminate tsetse from Unguja Island, Zanzibar (Vreysen et al., ).

However, the use of SIT in African settings has been criticised on ecological. Fruit flies are enormously important economic pests, as California has learned over the past few years (remember the Mediterranean Fruit Fly?).

The problem is expected to get worse, and issues of both basic research and control measures are very important for this pest. This book is the edited. Key words: sterile insect technique, area-wide integrated pest management, Lepidoptera, fruit flies, eradication, suppression, prevention, containment INTRODUCTION: THE PROBLEM The population of the world is increasing by 80 million people per year.

This means that agricultural output has to almost double within the next thirty. Mexico) "Sterile insect technique integrated management of fruit fly (Phase II): Report on field operations review of the Medfly SIT control program at the Hex River Valley and buffer zones", 21 October – 8 November The sterile insect technique (SIT) is arguably the most ecologically-compatible means of pest control in existence.

It is not a stand-alone technology, but should be integrated with other pest management technologies, such as bait application and sanitation, in an area-wide programme.Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) is an invasive pest of a wide range of commercial soft-skinned fruits.

To date, most management tactics are based on spraying of conventional and/or organic insecticides, baited traps, and netting exclusion. Interest has been expressed in using the sterile insect technique (SIT) as part of area-wide integrated pest management (AW-IPM) programs to Cited by: 1.